book recs?

Mar. 18th, 2014 11:44 pm
hoosierbitch: (BTVS Silly Funny Kink Romance Anya "Let')
[personal profile] hoosierbitch
I haven't been reading much lately (well, of the non-internet variety) and I'd like to do more. I have intermittent periods of really long down time at work that I could fill up with reading. But I feel like a runner prepping for a marathon--like, "Great Expectations" was unexpectedly hilarious but scattered, "Wuthering Heights" was scary but not a good book to read while being often interrupted, "Hawkeye: Little Hits" was adorable but v. short.

SO.

The book I just finished was "Unspoken" by Sarah Rees Brennan. It's part of a trilogy, I've got #2 on the way through ILL. It's a teen gothic romance mystery novel type thing? Only really good. Her last trilogy, "Demon's Lexicon," was a rollercoaster of awesome, and I loved it.

PLEASE RECOMMEND MORE?

I LIKE:sci-fi/fantasty (including urban fastasy)/Young Adult is fine/and not-sad-fiction. Preferably by female writers. I like Patricia McKillip, Robin McKinley, Terry Pratchett, Mercedes Lackey, Tamora Piece, and I LOVE LOVE LOVE Tanya Huff.

Are there any books that are top of your list that you'd recommend for right now, or that you think I should stick on my goodreads for later?

THANKS SO MUCH! MUCH MUCH MUCH LOVE!

Uh, returning the love, my fave books:
1) Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy
2) The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russel
3) Wolf Hall & Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel (OH GOD THEY'RE SO GOOD--only first book and sequel to win the Man Booker prize--AND I'M SO HISTORY DUMB THAT IDK WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN NEXT WITH THE BOLEYNS SO DON'T SPOIL ME BITCHES THE THIRD BOOK'S GONNA COME OUT SOMEDAY SOON PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE)

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-19 05:29 am (UTC)
greyeyes: (milliardo + book by babbled)
From: [personal profile] greyeyes
You just listed all the people I usually rec! So I guess I'll camp out and see what other people rec.

OHHH! If you haven't yet, Patricia Wrede wrote my FAVORITE PRINCESS/FEMALE HEROINE/PROTAGONIST EVER in a quartet that starts with "Dealing with Dragons". Young adult, but I believe they hold up fairly well, though to be honest, the first book is my favorite and each book goes down a little in my opinion, but still all worth reading.

Back to camping!

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-21 05:17 am (UTC)
greyeyes: (milliardo + book by babbled)
From: [personal profile] greyeyes
CIMORENE SO DOES!

Why thank you, you do too! ♥ It'll be a hard sell, but I always welcome new heroines!

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-19 09:08 am (UTC)
kiezh: Tree and birds reflected in water (Default)
From: [personal profile] kiezh
Have you read any Martha Wells books? Because I recommend all of them! (Well, I haven't read the Emilie books yet, so I recommend all of the rest.)

She does amazing worldbuilding and fascinating, unusual protagonists. Some recommended starting places:

Wheel of the Infinite: a standalone epic fantasy in an Asian setting with a dark-skinned older woman as protagonist. Great ensemble of characters, incredible depth of worldbuilding, and a plot that's kind of a mindfuck.

The Fall of Ile-Rien trilogy (Wizard Hunters, Ships of Air, Gate of Gods): gaslight-fantasy with world-hopping and, once again, an awesome ensemble of characters. You like snarky ruthless protagonists who are awesome but do not fully appreciate their own awesome, and who really shine under pressure, right? Let me introduce you to Tremaine Valiarde! SHE IS MY FAVORITE FOREVER. (Also, there is a strong implication in canon of a poly relationship developing among some of the main characters, although that's not a main focus. I hope that's specific enough to be a selling point and vague enough not to be spoilery...)

The Raksura trilogy (Cloud Roads, Serpent Sea, Siren Depths): secondary-world fantasy with no human characters at all! Would you like to investigate the social structure of some winged shapeshifters with fascinating gender dynamics? Also, worldbuilding. I really do not know any other author who does fantasy worldbuilding as well as Martha Wells.

I am kind of torn on whether or not to recommend Lois Bujold, because she used to be my favorite author and she wrote several of my favorite books, but I have strongly disliked everything she's written for at least the last ten years.

Bujold recs: For fantasy, read Curse of Chalion and Paladin of Souls. For SF... start with Cordelia's Honor and see if you're interested in diving into the Vorkosigan saga? (Though I would stop with Diplomatic Immunity, if you do.)

I hope these recs are of some use to you! :)

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-19 12:25 pm (UTC)
princessofgeeks: (Default)
From: [personal profile] princessofgeeks
Another vote for the Raksura books and Bujold as well.

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-22 01:57 am (UTC)
spatz: book cracked open over armrest, caption "happiness is" (book happiness)
From: [personal profile] spatz
*laughs* But I was gonna rec Martha Wells! I'm in the middle of an Ile-Rien re-read right now. I can vouch for the Emilie books, since I've read them: they're delightful, action-packed reads, with lots of steampunk shenanigans, breakneck pacing, and weird wonderful worldbuilding. And it's awesome to picture Emilie as a young Lyndie Greenwood, per word-of-author.

[personal profile] hoosierbitch, I think The Cloud Roads trilogy is the most up your alley for h/c reasons. Just saying.

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-19 12:25 pm (UTC)
princessofgeeks: (Default)
From: [personal profile] princessofgeeks
I just finished Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie, which is SF, and it's really good.

I very much enjoyed The Steerswoman books by Kirsten (I may have her name spelled wrong), which are SFF, much older. I ordered them used.

In mainstream fic, I enjoyed Fingersmith, which is about petty thieves and cons in Victorian London, loaded with wild sublots, although the ending left me scratching my head. I believe it won a British prize ten years ago.

Thanks for the rec list.

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-19 05:04 pm (UTC)
silverceri: Blue fairy girl (Default)
From: [personal profile] silverceri
I'd recommend Ellen Kushner's World of Riverside series. "Swordspoint", "The Privilege of the Sword", and "The Fall of Kings". I'd also recommend Emma Bull's "War for the Oaks" or "Finder." While not a female author, for urban fantasy I'd recommend any or all of Charles DeLint's novels. I'd also recommend David Weber's Honor Harrington series for SF and his War God's Own series for fantasy.

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-19 06:49 pm (UTC)
katikat: (Actors_ChrisPine2013_B)
From: [personal profile] katikat
Wen Spencer's "Ukiah Oregon" series. Great sci-fi.

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-22 02:00 am (UTC)
spatz: miniseries Alice approaches a vial of red liquid (Alice curiosity killed the cat)
From: [personal profile] spatz
I just read A Natural History of Dragons and the sequel by Marie Brennan, and liked them. The second book wasn't as strong as the first, but I'm looking forward to Isabella's continuing adventures in dragon science. :)

(no subject)

Date: 2014-03-23 03:25 am (UTC)
canaan: Jack Harkness (Default)
From: [personal profile] canaan
Anything by Melissa Scott. Steven Brust's Vlad Taltos books. Cj Cherryh is my fave author, but not everyone likes her style-I'd say start w/the The Pride of Chauner for approachability. Katie Waitman's The Merro Tree is phenomenal. Anne McCaffery's early stuff suffers a bit from being written in the late sixties/early seventies, & her late stuff deteriorated in sheer writing quality, but you'd probably be okay with Dragonsong, Dragonsinger, & Dragondrums. Oh, & another guy, but one of the good guys: Jim C. Hines. I haven't read his princess books (which are more like anti-princess books) or the goblin stuff, but Libriomancer & its sequel(s) are urban fantasy that's a little different from any other urban fantasy I can think of, & lots of fun.